Jump to content

HPCsoYESTERDAY

Members
  • Content Count

    1,200
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by HPCsoYESTERDAY

  1. HPCsoYESTERDAY

    GOLD

    this conversation now goes to pm! no disrespect to any of the other posters here, but as it is an open forum where anyone can read, I like to keep some business to myself
  2. HPCsoYESTERDAY

    GOLD

    I went into more detail on this on the 'watch silver' thread. Basically, if I sell coins, I use eBay where they are nearly getting double spot. paper prices are becoming more meaningless to me personally as each day goes by (applies to gold but to a lesser extent eg. krugs selling at £490 last week edit - and I'm sure I get some stick for this but as everyday goes by, kitco and coininvests silver inventory is decreasing. fact.
  3. HPCsoYESTERDAY

    GOLD

    please see post 818 however, I should of perhaps put more emphasis on silver in my penultimate post
  4. HPCsoYESTERDAY

    GOLD

    yes, but........... paper price may fall given the bullsh1t market we find ourselves in at the mo - physical price should continue with its dis-connect Still a lot of uncertainty out there - lehman bankruptcy is not a given yet: it's being reported as the most likely scenario unless I've missed some news in the last 30 mins
  5. HPCsoYESTERDAY

    GOLD

    Time to load up you two?
  6. HPCsoYESTERDAY

    GOLD

    wow - assuming you are correct (and I have no reason to believe otherwise, given the apparent depth of your knowledge) the misinformation out there is terrible concerning the humble origins of our currency!
  7. HPCsoYESTERDAY

    GOLD

    surely both explanations can co-exist? as I was referring to pound Sterling, can it be the case that pound has Roman origin and sterling Anglo-Saxon? http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/.../pound-sterling the basic monetary unit of Great Britain, divided (since 1971) decimally into 100 new pence. The term is derived from the fact that, about 775, silver coins known as “sterlings” were issued in the Saxon kingdoms, 240 of them being minted from a pound of silver, the weight of which was probably about equal to the later troy pound. Hence large payments came to be reckoned in “pounds of sterlings,” a phrase later shortened to “pounds sterling.” After the Norman Conquest the pound was divided for accounting purposes into 20 shillings and into 240 pennies, or pence. In medieval Latin documents the words libra, solidus, and denarius were used to denote the pound, shilling, and penny, which gave rise to the use of the symbols £, s., and d.
  8. HPCsoYESTERDAY

    GOLD

    wiki concurs: 'There is some uncertainty as to the origin of the term pound sterling. Some sources say it dates back to Anglo-Saxon times, when coins called sterlings were minted from silver; 240 of these sterlings weighed one pound, and large payments came to be made in "pounds of sterlings".' http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pound_sterling#cite_note-5 and here is the silver weights of modern (pre 1920) UK coinage: Prior to 1920, British silver coins contained high purity, 92.5% (Sterling) silver. These coins contain the following amounts of actual silver weight: * Threepence (.0420 Troy ounces of actual silver weight) * Sixpence (.0841 Troy ounces) (Krause and Mishler's Standard Catalog of World Coins, 19th Century Edition 1801-1900, First Edition, states that the silver content of the sixpence coin was .0895 Troy ounces from 1838-1919, as the weight of this coin slightly increased in 1838, but so far that hasn't been corroborated by other sources.) * Shilling (.1682 Troy ounces) * Florin (.3364 Troy ounces) * Half Crown (.4206 Troy ounces) * Double Florins (1887-1890) (.6727 Troy ounces) * Crown (.8409 Troy ounces) http://reviews.ebay.com/British-coins-silv...000000001664130
  9. HPCsoYESTERDAY

    GOLD

    going further off tangent here (apologies in advance)............. To make their own coins 'stand' alongside post 1919 Sterling coins, the Irish govt. minted coins (between 1928 until 1943) containing 75% silver, a higher content than the equivalent British coin. It is believed that this was done so that the new currency would not be seen as a poor substitute to the British currency which circulated alongside. (ref. wiki) and here's an interesting article: http://www.expressandstar.com/2008/04/18/c...on-silver-rush/ Cashing in on silver rush It started with a gold rush, and now a Dudley jewellers’ is offering top prices for old English silver coins. Rex Johnson & Son in Birdcage Walk is calling for people to dig out money from decades gone by and cash them in for what could add up to hundreds of pounds. The shop has had queues outside for the last 12 weeks, with people bringing in their old gold chains and watches while the price of gold soars. Now silver is also enjoying a boom, and owner Mr David Johnson is calling on residents to make the most of it and bring in any old coins that have been gathering dust in the bottom of the drawer. He said: “The coins have been coming in by the bucketloads. We are looking for anything from the half-crown, sixpences, shillings, silver threepenny bits like they used to put in the Xmas puddings, two-shilling pieces, or a crown. “We are giving ten times face value for coins pre-1947, so every pound gets ten pounds, and pre-1920 we will give twenty times the original value. “We have had a huge response, particularly from the older generation who have had them in their bottom drawers all these years.” Mr Johnson said the biggest exchange was a woman who brought in her collection of coins and left with £800. He added : “People are quite shocked; they bring in their little packet of coins and go home with over £100. “People have been distracted by the price of gold, but the silver has also been holding a high value as well over this period and, since people have begun realising this, the queues have been doubling outside the shop.” Rex Johnson says it continues to offer top prices for silver and gold at both its Dudley shop and its Birmingham base in Corporation Street, Monday to Saturday. The jewellers are also still on the lookout for gold, the price of which is still soaring. Typical items brought in for valuation and sale included medallion chains, popular in the 1980s but which have now fallen out of fashion, and even sovereign rings – a must-have for young men five-years ago. Mr Johnson said: “It is mainly things they don’t wear anymore or that are broken.”
  10. HPCsoYESTERDAY

    GOLD

    'Real' Sterling (i.e. .925 silver in coinage) survived until 1920. But between 1920-1947 we had .5 silver in coinage, so you could say that between the Great Wars we had 'half' sterling. edit: I remember reading somewhere that the .500 silver mix in coins was varied with other metals (nickel, copper etc.) in the early years of .5 silver coinage (i.e. early 20s) until an alloy was found that was most durable and presentable, hence you can get examples of the different 'mixes' in the early years. this is a good site: http://www.tclayton.demon.co.uk/coins.html
  11. HPCsoYESTERDAY

    GOLD

    The spin and bu11shit out there at the moment is incredible. the DOW rallies late in the session on the possibility of a buyer for Lehman, GM and Ford are up on the prospect of bailouts. Surely, if (miraculously) a buyer is found for Lehman over the weekend it will be just like Bear Stearns (i.e. Fed involvement). Once (if) GM gets a bailout, then it will be open season (hence ford share price rises). Welcome to the new capitalism baby!! http://www.reuters.com/article/marketsNews...20080911?rpc=44
  12. HPCsoYESTERDAY

    SILVER

    and today's kitco message on the homepage is......... 'In order to reflect the current strong demand for Silver Maples and Silver Eagles, Kitco is temporarily increasing its current bid (buyback) price for these particular products. Please visit our Selling to Kitco page for more details.' oops they forgot to tell you there also out of stock of the above OK - as some have pointed out, 'teeny-weeny' coins wont set the market alight, but if you want some coins best get em soon eh?!
  13. HPCsoYESTERDAY

    SILVER

    good call with regard to the drop to the mid 10s / I hope you're right with the +ve prediction!!
  14. HPCsoYESTERDAY

    SILVER

    Fair point - for me, the value of silver (at present) is what I can get for selling a coin. Not a great economic theory I grant you, but it keeps me sane!!!!! hence, I continue to watch the retail market like a hawk
  15. HPCsoYESTERDAY

    SILVER

    Please understand where I am coming from here: I buy coins, I sell coins. I know what prices I can buy at, I know what prices I can sell at. 'something will have to give' if the 'true' value of silver is the paper price at present- hence the coins are very over-valued. conversely, if like kitco is showing, the demand for small bars / coins is outstripping supply, then the price will hold. that's where I deal my silver
  16. HPCsoYESTERDAY

    SILVER

    yes but a lot of us here deal / invest in them teeny weeny coins
  17. HPCsoYESTERDAY

    SILVER

    9 hrs to go on ebay / 2008 silver eagle at £11.12 http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/1-Oz-Troy-999-2008-B...id=p3286.c0.m14 so at the moment before the auction closes that's nearly double £ spot price (£6.06) Perhaps, I would take more note of what some here are saying if I only traded on paper - but I don't (thank f***!)
  18. HPCsoYESTERDAY

    SILVER

    The way I see it: the retail coin market / small bullion (+demand) is going to meet the paper market (- demand) and something will have to give 13 mins in: 'one refiner I talked to could not get blanks (for rounds / small bars) he is having to buy 1000oz bars instead (with delays) just to make the rounds / small bars'
  19. HPCsoYESTERDAY

    SILVER

    I notice that kitco are now out of stock on maples (as well as eagles). Somethings gotta give.
  20. HPCsoYESTERDAY

    SILVER

    but did you listen to the link? This is new information about the jump in short selling between July and August. Please listen to it with an open mind. btw, I checked some of my old orders - maples were selling for £10.21 (ex vat) at the end of June on coininvest. Today they are £9.23 (ex VAT).
  21. HPCsoYESTERDAY

    SILVER

    I wish some of the silver bashers on this thread would seriously look at what is being said about physical price vs. paper price. Yesterday, Magpie told me she/he had 'heard all the arguments' before etc. in response to a post I made; however, this post was bumping laymans link to the FFS broadcast where new data had come to light about a massive short position being taken on Comex by investment banks. Hence, this information was new and none of us knew about it till recently. Also, wrongmove, start looking at the price of physical vs. paper please. I am not in denial, I realize that ag price has taken a massive downturn since July - but not as bad as you might think looking at physical prices. Magpie/ Wrongmove. Please listen to laymans link - I would be interested to hear your take on it.
  22. HPCsoYESTERDAY

    SILVER

    I'm not defending cg's position (I'm sure he can do that himself). My 1st post to you was to try and enlighten you on what's hapenning in the silver market at the moment, namely, paper price manipulation down vs real physical demand up.
  23. HPCsoYESTERDAY

    SILVER

    True - less generous posters might call it trolling
  24. HPCsoYESTERDAY

    SILVER

    Magpie - have a listen to this: Here's some pointers for you: Listen from 8 Mins in: Between July and August: 10 x increase in short position from inv. banks..... 3 investment banks (responsible for) 25% of open interest contracts (silver) on the Comex..... (same as) 170 million oz silver / 20% Annual output of mines of silver in a year.... Now ask yourself, what happens when the physical market disconnects completely from the paper market?
  25. HPCsoYESTERDAY

    GOLD

    link plays video - http://finance.yahoo.com/tech-ticker/artic...DJI,XLF,USO,XLE Washington Wants Oil Down, Stocks Up Before Election, Harrison Says Posted Sep 09, 2008 01:03pm EDT by Aaron Task in Investing, Commodities, Banking With the nationalization of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, it's impossible to argue the Federal government isn't playing a crucial and growing role in the financial markets. "Call it socialism, manipulation, intervention, [or] desperation. Call it what you will but don't underestimate the mandate," says Todd Harrison, CEO of Minyanville.com. "The agenda [of policymakers] is very clear," he continues. "They need to stabilize the system [to] avoid the unthinkable -- a crash that's going to suck global capital markets in the abyss." Certainly there's an economic benefit to avoiding a global financial market collapse. But Harrison has long argued policymakers had two major goals ahead of the election they are still pursuing: lower oil prices to $100 or below, and get equity prices higher. Given all that's transpired in the past year, from the bailout of Bear Stearns to the Fed's special financial vehicles for Wall Street to this weekend's intervention, one thing is clear: The "invisible hand" in the markets these days belongs to Uncle Sam
×