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Yesterday somebody posted a link to an audio interview with Peter Schiff, but I don't remember which thread it is in (or was it at HPC?).

 

Could somebody point me to it?

 

An interesting point he made about the U.S. housing market is that he thinks it will not find a bottom until interest rates find a top. So on that basis the bottom could still be several years off.

 

Today, dollar down and gold up quite a bit, but less so in euros than dollars. USD 1.4221 to buy one euro. :o

 

 

 

http://kingworldnews.com/kingworldnews/Pod...ter_Schiff.html

 

Hope this is it. Bubb posted it in his mini thread on the Tampa housing market.

 

 

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http://kingworldnews.com/kingworldnews/Pod...ter_Schiff.html

 

Hope this is it. Bubb posted it in his mini thread on the Tampa housing market.

That's the one. Thanks very much.

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

An interesting quote from a historical novel about QE1.

“I am sure,” he said coldly. “For if you had continued with your forgetfulness till the day that you called in the old coin and issued new, I would have been left with a small treasure room filled with dross, would I not? And left at a substantial loss, would I not? Was it your intention that I should suffer?”

 

Elizabeth flushed. “I didn’t know you were storing small coin.”

 

“I have lands; my tenants do not pay their rents in bullion, alas. I have trading debts which are paid in small coin. I have chests and chests of pennies and farthings. Do tell me what I may get for them?”

 

“A little more than their weight,” she said in a very small voice.

 

“Not their face value?”

 

She shook her head in silence. “We are calling in the coins and issuing new,” she said. “It is Gresham’s plan -- you know of it yourself. We have to make the coins anew.”

So is this the Gresham of Gresham's Law?

 

Link (about a possible overnight dollar devaluation):

http://www.dollarcollapse.com/iNP/view.asp?ID=102

 

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That's the one. Thanks very much.

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

An interesting quote from a historical novel about QE1.

 

So is this the Gresham of Gresham's Law?

 

Link (about a possible overnight dollar devaluation):

http://www.dollarcollapse.com/iNP/view.asp?ID=102

 

 

I think so:-

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gresham%27s_law

 

 

According to the economist George Selgin in his paper "Gresham's Law":

 

As for Gresham himself, he observed "that good and bad coin cannot circulate together" in a letter written to Queen Elizabeth on the occasion of her accession in 1558. The statement was part of Gresham's explanation for the "unexampled state of badness" England's coinage had been left in following the "Great Debasements" of Henry VIII and Edward VI, which reduced the metallic value of English silver coins to a small fraction of what that value had been at the time of Henry VII. It was owing to these debasements, Gresham observed to the Queen, that "all your fine gold was convayed out of this your realm."[3]

 

Gresham made his observations of good and bad money while in the service of Queen Elizabeth, with respect only to the observed poor quality of the British coinage. The previous monarchs, Henry VIII and Edward VI, had forced the people to accept debased coinage by means of their legal tender laws. Gresham also made his comparison of good and bad money where the precious metal in the money was the same. He did not compare silver to gold, or gold to paper.

 

 

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That's the one. Thanks very much.

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

An interesting quote from a historical novel about QE1.

 

So is this the Gresham of Gresham's Law?

 

Link (about a possible overnight dollar devaluation):

http://www.dollarcollapse.com/iNP/view.asp?ID=102

 

 

I think so:-

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gresham%27s_law

 

 

According to the economist George Selgin in his paper "Gresham's Law":

 

As for Gresham himself, he observed "that good and bad coin cannot circulate together" in a letter written to Queen Elizabeth on the occasion of her accession in 1558. The statement was part of Gresham's explanation for the "unexampled state of badness" England's coinage had been left in following the "Great Debasements" of Henry VIII and Edward VI, which reduced the metallic value of English silver coins to a small fraction of what that value had been at the time of Henry VII. It was owing to these debasements, Gresham observed to the Queen, that "all your fine gold was convayed out of this your realm."[3]

 

Gresham made his observations of good and bad money while in the service of Queen Elizabeth, with respect only to the observed poor quality of the British coinage. The previous monarchs, Henry VIII and Edward VI, had forced the people to accept debased coinage by means of their legal tender laws. Gresham also made his comparison of good and bad money where the precious metal in the money was the same. He did not compare silver to gold, or gold to paper.

 

 

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Double post.

 

au00-pres.gif

 

ag00-pres.gif

 

pt92-pres.gif

 

 

Long-termish charts for the three metals here. Seems to me these graphs are signalling:

 

Gold= Safe Investment

 

Silver= Speculative Trade

 

Platinum= Gambling

 

The gold graph is almost a thing of beauty. imo the complete recovery in the gold price as compared to the other metals reflects that it has been effectively "monetized" in the minds of investors. Gold looks like it wants to go higher soon. I would not be surprised to see it go through 1000 sometime this summer or shortly after, but then I also wouldn't be surprised to see it subsequently come back down through 1000... before heading higher of course. I think the level we are at now [900] is the new base.

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Is GLD A Good Deal?

Written by Julian Murdoch

Monday, 20 July 2009 09:35

 

GLD's largest shareholder, until recently, was noted hedge fund manager David Einhorn's Greenlight Capital hedge fund. Last week, we learned that he'd sold all of his GLD (SPDR Gold Shares (NSYE Arca)) GLD holdings in favor of physical bullion. How much? About 4.2 million shares of GLD, or roughly $390 million.

 

 

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Have you seen this on goldismoney, possible fake 2009 phillys on the market. May end up to be nothing but the OP seems quiet convinced :unsure: Well worth reading the whole thread, waiting for the assay results

 

http://goldismoney.info/forums/showthread.php?t=392148

Oh dear.. you're going to love this one. Last night, before I had seen this post from you, I noticed that one of my 1oz maples looks slightly 'redder' than the others; It's REALLY close though in colour. Now this coin is one I have handled more than the others so I am hoping it might just be the grease might have changed the colour slightly. The weight is pretty much spot-on 1ozt (31.11g) and the diameter/thickness looked fine to me but when I went to get it out of the capsule (30mm) it stuck slightly whereas the others come out just fine from their cases!! I will measure this coin again with calipers tonight.

Ping test seemed ok, coin does not look like a fake. Originally purchased from CID in 2008.

:(

 

EDIT: I'm pretty sure it's an OK coin, but the slight colour difference is a bit unnerving. Will post results reweigh/measure results asap.

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I hadn't heard of it, but it seems this is a known phenomena.

 

https://www.kitcomm.com/showthread.php?t=43344

 

Oh dear.. you're going to love this one. Last night, before I had seen this post from you, I noticed that one of my 1oz maples looks slightly 'redder' than the others; It's REALLY close though in colour. Now this coin is one I have handled more than the others so I am hoping it might just be the grease might have changed the colour slightly. The weight is pretty much spot-on 1ozt (31.11g) and the diameter/thickness looked fine to me but when I went to get it out of the capsule (30mm) it stuck slightly whereas the others come out just fine from their cases!! I will measure this coin again with calipers tonight.

Ping test seemed ok, coin does not look like a fake. Originally purchased from CID in 2008.

:(

 

EDIT: I'm pretty sure it's an OK coin, but the slight colour difference is a bit unnerving. Will post results reweigh/measure results asap.

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ok, results in:

 

diameter 30.00mm (true=30.00)

thickness 2.80mm at the thickest point I could find (true=2.87)

mass 31.13g (true 31.1+g)

 

so it compares favourably, though slightly thinner. - but the mass is dead on so I am sure it's not a fake as it would otherwise have to be made from like Osmium or Platinum or something WAY rarer than gold.

Panic over.

 

EDIT: FishingWithJesse; authorised resellers? - in the UK for maples!? - This was from CoinInvest

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ok, results in:

 

diameter 30.00mm (true=30.00)

thickness 2.80mm at the thickest point I could find (true=2.87)

mass 31.13g (true 31.1+g)

 

so it compares favourably, though slightly thinner. - but the mass is dead on so I am sure it's not a fake as it would otherwise have to be made from like Osmium or Platinum or something WAY rarer than gold.

Panic over.

 

EDIT: FishingWithJesse; authorised resellers? - in the UK for maples!? - This was from CoinInvest

 

 

Here you go : http://www.mint.ca

 

To find a dealer near you, check the North American and International listings below or look in the Yellow Pages to find a Royal Canadian Mint numismatic coin dealer in your area. You can also Contact us or a Canada Post branch.

 

Canadian dealers | US dealers | International dealers

 

 

 

Canadian dealers

Alberta | British Columbia | Manitoba | Nova Scotia | Ontario | Quebec

 

Alberta

J. Harrison Agencies Inc.

Wholesale & Retail

Retail store name: "Clyde Vincett Ltd."

#42 Crossroads Market

1235 - 26 Ave S.E.

Calgary, Alberta T2G 1R7

Tel: Jim @ 403-238-4394 or Keith @ 403-248-0688

 

National Pride Coin & Stamp

Ray Neiman

8005-104 Street N.W.

Edmonton, Alberta T6E 4E3

Tel: 780-433-7288

Fax: 403-434-9466

 

Northgate Stamp Shop

Sein Mah

12516, 118th Avenue Nw N.

Edmonton, Alberta T5L 2K6

Tel: 780-424-8511

Fax: 780-424-8511

 

West Edmonton Coin & Stamp

Jack Jensen

2720-8882-170th Street

Place 9, WEM

Edmonton, Alberta T5T 4J2

Tel: 780-444-1156

Fax: 780-486-5243

 

[ Back to top ]

 

British Columbia

A.A.A. Stamp Coin Jewellery Inc.

Michael Tarantino

809 Fort Street

Victoria, B.C. V8W 1H6

Tel: 250-384-1315

Fax: 250-384-4516

rmcgaw3@shawcable.com

 

Chantou International Coin & Stamp

Giuseppe Iorio

6537 Fraser Street

Vancouver, B.C. V5X 3T4

Tel: 604-321-7447

Fax: 604-321-7876

 

J & M Coin & Jewellery Ltd.

Joseph Iorio

127 East Broadway Avenue

Vancouver, B.C. V5Y 1W1

Tel: 604-876-7181

Tel: 1-888-244-9999

Fax: 604-876-1518

jandm@jandm.com

 

Van Isle Coin & Stamp

Ron Fritz

831 Fort Street

Victoria, B.C. V8W 1H6

Tel: 250-382-6331

Fax: 250-382-6331

vanislecoin@shaw.ca

 

[ Back to top ]

 

Manitoba

Collectibles Canada

Marlene Sturrey

2211 McPhillips Street

Unit O

Winnipeg, Manitoba R2V 3M5

Tel: 204-586-6263

Fax: 416-586-6263

cash.cdn@shawlink.ca

 

Gatewest Coins

Ian Laing

1711 Corydon Ave.

Winnipeg, Manitoba R3N 0J9

Tel: 204-489-9112

Fax: 204-489-9118

www.gatewestcoin.com/contact

 

[ Back to top ]

 

Nova Scotia

Citadel Coins

Gerard Feehan

1903 Barrington Street

Barrington Place Shops

Halifax, Nova Scotia B3J 3L7

Tel: 902-492-0130

Fax: 902-423-5998

citadelcoins@eastlink.ca

 

[ Back to top ]

 

Ontario

Arcade Coins

Michael Barber

10 King St. E., Suite 301

Toronto, Ontario M5C 1C3

Tel: 416-368-6655

Fax: 416-368-5951

arcadecoins@idirect.com

 

Ashbrook Coins Stamps Antiques & Collectibles

Andrew Driega

911 Richmond Road

Ottawa, Ontario K2A 0G8

Tel: 613-798-9911

Fax: 613-798-0830

driegaa@aol.com

 

Canadian Coin & Currency

Steven Bromberg

10211 Yonge Street

Richmond Hill, Ontario L4C 3B6

Tel: 905-883-5300

Tel: 1-800-236-2646

Fax: 905-883-5929

info@cdncoin.com

 

Coin Market

Mark Drake

714 Yonge Street

2nd Floor

Toronto, Ontario M4Y 2B3

Tel: 416-964-1632

Fax: 416-964-1632

coinmarket@gmail.com

http://coinmarket.webs.com

 

House of Stamps

Chrisitan Goetz

100 City Centre Drive

Unit 123A

Mississauga, Ontario L5B 2C9

Tel: 905-848-2646

Fax: 905-848-0502

houseofstamps@rogers.com

 

[ Back to top ]

 

Quebec

Achetons-Vendons

Daniel Grenier

314 Lafontaine

Rivière-du-Loup, Québec G5R 3B1

Tel: 418-721-4444

Fax: 418-721-4444

achetons@cgocable.ca

 

Cartes, Timbres et Monnaie Ste-Foy

www.imaginaire.com

Benoît Doyon

2740 boul. Laurier, 3ième étage

Ste-Foy, Québec G1V 4P7

Tel: 418-658-5639

Fax: 418-658-2867

info@ctm-ste-foy.com

 

Monnaie Collection Royale

André Goulet

C.P. 128

Grand-mère, Québec G9T 5K7

Tel: 819-533-4633

Tel: 1-877-222-0142

Fax: 819-538-6525

info@monnaieroyale.com

 

Monnaie Timbres de la Capitale

Eric Paquette

5401 boul. des Galeries, Suite 1018

Québec, Québec G2K 1N4

Tel: 418-628-9838

Fax: 418-628-2351

cpnum@qc.aira.com

 

Rousseau timbres et monnaies

www.rousseaucollections.com

Lise Rousseau

585, rue Sainte-Catherine ouest

Montréal, Québec H3B 3Y5

Tel: 514-281-4756

Tel: 1-800-561-9977

rousseaucollections@bellnet.ca

 

[ Back to top ]

 

US dealers

Talisman Coins

www.TalismanCoins.com

9051 Watson Road Suite 103

St. Louis, MO 63126

Tel: 314-968-3980

Tel: 1-888-552-2646

Fax: 314-968-3801

info@talismancoins.com

 

World Mints Ltd.

worldmintsltd.com

Jerry L. Morgan

P.O. Box 410444

Saint Louis, MO 63141

Tel : 314-249-3431

jerrycoin@aol.com

 

Coin Cradle

2810 West Kennewick Ave.

Kennewick, WA 99336

Tel: 509-735-2172

Fax: 509-783-8042

bjenner.333@aol.com

 

[ Back to top ]

 

 

 

International dealers

Taisei Stamps & Coins Co.

4F.,4-9-4 Hatchobori

Shinkawa, Chuo-Ku Tokyo

104-0032 Japan

Tel: 81-3-3297-8222

Fax: 81-3-3297-8227

trade@taiseicoins.com

 

Downie's

255 Johnston St., Abbotsford

Melbourne," Victoria 3067

Australia

Tel: 61-39-419-7588

Fax: 61-39-416-3385

kdownie@downies.com

 

IMM Münz-Institut, Institut für Münz- und Medaillenkunst GmbH

Rennweg 79-81

1034 Wien,Austria

Tel: +43 1 718112233

Fax: +43 1 718112210

young@imm-wien.at

 

Schoeller & Co. Muenzhandel GmbH

Bankaktiengesellschaft Renngasse 14

A-1010 Wien, Austria

Tel: 43-1-5333-606

Fax: 43-1-5333-606-44

 

[ Back to top ]

 

Mønthuset Danmark A/S

Strandvejen 102 E

2900 Hellerup, Denmark

Tel: +45 77 302010

Fax: +45 77 302019

kb@monthuset.dk

 

The Westminster Collection Ltd.

126 Rickmansworth Road, Watford

Hertsfordshire WD18 7WS, England

Tel: 44-1-923-475563

Fax: 44-1-923-475567

ps@westminstercollection.com

 

Oy Nordic Moneta Ab

Malminkaari 21 A, P.O. Box 770

00700 Helsinki, Finland

Tel: +358 9 47702138

Fax: +358 9 47702140

riitta.kivisto@rahapajamoneta.fi

 

MDM Münzhandelsgesellschaft mbH Deutsche Münze

Theodor-Heuss-Straße 7

38097 Braunschweig, Germany

Mrs. Anja Scheunemann

Head of International Marketing & Sales

Tel: +49 531 205-1122

Fax: +49 531 205-1700

anja.scheunemann@mdm.de

 

[ Back to top ]

 

International Coins (Hong Kong) Ltd.

26/F Wing On House, 71 Des Voeux Road, Central

Hong Kong

Tel: 852-2845-8330

Fax: 852-2-845-9110

iclpsp@pacific.net.hk

 

Intercoins S.p.A.

Via Carducci, 9

20123 Milan, Italy

Tel: 39-02-890-0404

Fax: 39-02-805-6065

intercoins@intercoins.it

 

Hwadong Coin & Banknote

1466-14 Seocho-Dong, Seocho-Guy, C.P.O. Box 4183

Seoul, Korea

Tel: 82-2-597-8740 Fax: 822-597-8741

hwadong@hwadong.com

 

[ Back to top ]

 

Modern Numismatic International b.v.

P.O. Box 385

1271 AJ Huizen, Netherlands

Tel: +31 35 751 13 00

Fax: +31 35 751 13 50

sales@mnint.eu

 

Samlerhuset Norge AS

Trollåsveien 6, P.O. Box 523

1411 Kolbotn, Norway

Tel: +47 66811500

Fax: +47 66819673

niclas.wate@samlerhuset.no

 

Skarbnica Narodowa Sp. z o.o.

Emilii Plater 53, XI floor

00-113 Warsaw, Poland

Tel: +48 22 5286766

Fax: +48 22 5286701

stephen.lee@samlerhuset.com

 

Inwestycje Alternatywne Profit S.A.

www.e-numizmatyka.pl

Marszalkowska 60/7, III floor

00-545 Warsaw, Poland

Tel: +48 22 628-72-83

Fax: +48 22 622-03-37

biuro@e-numizmatyka.pl

 

Lamas Bolano S.p.A.

Gran Via, 610

08007 Barcelona, Spain

Tel: 34-93-317-7908

Fax: 34-93-302-1847

lamasbolano@lamasbolano.com

 

[ Back to top ]

 

Mynthuset Sverige AB

Jörgen Kocksgatan 9

211 20 Malmö, Sweden

Tel: +46 40 6028270

Fax: +46 40 6028201

mbo@mynthuset.se

 

Het Nederlandsche Muntenhuis

P.O. Box 20520

1001 NM Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Tel: +800 6868366

Fax: +800 8763535

j.scriven@muntenhuis.nl

 

http://www.mint.ca/store/mint/customer-ser...6#international

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Thanks for the historical note. I notice that the article also says:

An early form of Gresham's Law was described by Nicolaus Copernicus in the treatise Monetae cudendae ratio, first drawn up in the year (1519) that Thomas Gresham was born. Copernicus wrote that "bad (debased) coinage drives good (un-debased) coinage out of circulation."[4]
So Copernicus was earlier and the Wikipedia article on Copernicus says:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicolaus_Copernicus

This phenomenon had been noted earlier by Nicole Oresme, but Copernicus rediscovered it independently.
So it seems that the French philosopher Nicole Oresme (c. 1323 - July 11, 1382) was the earliest to state Gresham's Law.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicole_Oresme

 

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One of my favorite sayings that Bernard Baruch gets credited for goes like this:

 

“The main purpose of the stock market is to make fools of as many men as possible.”

when the head and shoulders formation reversed and the market squeezed all the shorts dry.

 

Dow : 8,916 68 0.77%

Nasdaq comp : 1,916 7 0.36%

S&P 500 : 955 3 0.36%

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ok, results in:

 

diameter 30.00mm (true=30.00)

thickness 2.80mm at the thickest point I could find (true=2.87)

mass 31.13g (true 31.1+g)

 

so it compares favourably, though slightly thinner. - but the mass is dead on so I am sure it's not a fake as it would otherwise have to be made from like Osmium or Platinum or something WAY rarer than gold.

Panic over.

 

EDIT: FishingWithJesse; authorised resellers? - in the UK for maples!? - This was from CoinInvest

 

CID are a reputable dealer. They wouldn’t send you a fake coin (:unsure:)

 

Phone them and ask about the red(ish) colour. They’ve been very good whenever I have phoned them

 

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CID are a reputable dealer. They wouldn’t send you a fake coin (:unsure:)

 

Phone them and ask about the red(ish) colour. They’ve been very good whenever I have phoned them

 

Reddish marks can be what is known as copper spotting. I have a maple with several copper marks on it. They look almost like stains or some kind of rust. Perfectly normal, apparently, despite gold being virtually immune to most tarnish etc.

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Copper Spotting. I'd be interested in seeing a picture if you can manage one.

 

What Causes Red Spots

Red spot can occur on almost any gold coin, it certainly happens on 22 carat gold coins. We have never seen it on .999(9) fine gold coins, and presume it is virtually impossible for it to occur on fine gold.

From our knowledge of metallurgy, we can tell you that when gold is alloyed, usually with copper or copper and silver, the alloying is obviously done in the molten state, and then has to cool. During cooling, crystalisation occurs, the crystal forming around "seeds" which are molecules of the elemental metals. There is a slight tendency for the elements with the highest melting point to start to crystalise first, and this can lead to small localised areas with slightly higher or lower concentrations of the constituent elements. In ternary alloys (three elements) three pairs of binary (two elements) alloys can also form. These areas of variable alloy are usually of microscopic proportion, but can sometimes be large enough to be visually discernable.

Copper oxidises and forms other salts fairly readily whereas gold is almost completely inert, and silver lies in between, although it is fairly unreactive. This means that if some parts of the alloy are copper rich, and are exposed on the surface of the coin, then it is possible for these parts to exhibit toning or tarnishing. The red spots are areas with a higher copper content, and as copper is a red coloured metal, this shows itself in an area which is less yellow and more red than the rest of the coin. If this area subsequently tarnishes, it would almost certainly go towards a deeper red or brown colour. Whenever we have seen red spot, it has always been an area about the size of a pinhead, sometimes with more than one spot on a coin.

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Reddish marks can be what is known as copper spotting. I have a maple with several copper marks on it. They look almost like stains or some kind of rust. Perfectly normal, apparently, despite gold being virtually immune to most tarnish etc.

It's just the .00001% impurity showing up. As you say, nothing to worry about.

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Oh dear.. you're going to love this one. Last night, before I had seen this post from you, I noticed that one of my 1oz maples looks slightly 'redder' than the others; It's REALLY close though in colour. Now this coin is one I have handled more than the others so I am hoping it might just be the grease might have changed the colour slightly. The weight is pretty much spot-on 1ozt (31.11g) and the diameter/thickness looked fine to me but when I went to get it out of the capsule (30mm) it stuck slightly whereas the others come out just fine from their cases!! I will measure this coin again with calipers tonight.

Ping test seemed ok, coin does not look like a fake. Originally purchased from CID in 2008.

:(

 

EDIT: I'm pretty sure it's an OK coin, but the slight colour difference is a bit unnerving. Will post results reweigh/measure results asap.

 

 

You will have no problem whatsoever with the maples, as long as the size and weight is accurate, 24 carat is impossible to fake unless they use platinum, which is more valuable.

 

The red spots are mainly on the coins that are alloyed with copper, Krugerrands, sovs, early britanias, etc..

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Im pleasantly suprised how well gold is holding up durring these summer months. I have been away for some time due to moving house and I lost my internet connection, so I have not been able to keep up with things. I hope everyone is OK.

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Reddish marks can be what is known as copper spotting. I have a maple with several copper marks on it. They look almost like stains or some kind of rust. Perfectly normal, apparently, despite gold being virtually immune to most tarnish etc.

 

The gold is probably unmarked, it may just be a reaction of contaminants in a thin layer on the surface of the gold at an almost microscopic level. Almost all metals have some sort of reaction with oxygen, gold is one of the most resistant. You could possibly clean it off, but I would advise against over-cleaning, the surface layer is possibly one of the factors that helps to protect gold from damage

 

It could be some sort of oligodynamic effect creating a fine surface layer.

 

The oligodynamic effect was discovered in 1893 by the Swiss Karl Wilhelm von Nägeli as a toxic effect of metal-ions on living cells, algae, molds, spores, fungus, virus, prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms, even in relatively low concentrations. This antimicrobial effect is shown by ions of: mercury, silver, copper, iron, lead, zinc, bismuth, gold, aluminium and other metals.

 

Especially heavy metals show this effect. The exact mechanism of action is still unknown. Data from silver suggest that these ions denature proteins (enzymes) of the target cell or organism by binding to reactive groups resulting in their precipitation and inactivation. Silver inactivates enzymes by reacting with the thiol groups to form silver sulfides. Silver also reacts with the amino-, carboxyl-, phosphate-, and imidazole-groups and diminish the activities of lactate dehydrogenase and glutathione peroxidase. Bacteria (Gram-positive and Gram-negative) are in general affected by the oligodynamic effect, but they can develop a heavy-metal resistance, or in the case of silver a silver-resistance. Viruses in general are not very sensitive. The toxic effect is fully developed often only after a long time (many hours).

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oligodynamic_effect

 

 

 

Iron, as we all know rusts, silver blackens, copper forms a green residue on the surface, aluminum and stainless steel form a thin almost invisible surface layer after contact with air. Brass kills bacteria and the buildup darkens the metal. Funny how people think that nice clean looking steel door handles are more hygienic than old hard to clean brass, the brass is much better for hygiene.

 

In Stainless steel, the chromium forms a passivation layer of chromium(III) oxide (Cr2O3) when exposed to oxygen. The layer is too thin to be visible, and the metal remains lustrous. It is impervious to water and air, protecting the metal beneath. Also, this layer quickly reforms when the surface is scratched. This phenomenon is called passivation and is seen in other metals, such as aluminium and titanium.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stainless_steel

 

Aluminium oxide is responsible for resistance of metallic aluminium to weathering. Metallic aluminium is very reactive with atmospheric oxygen, and a thin passivation layer of alumina (4 nm thickness) forms in about 100 picoseconds on any exposed aluminium surface.[5] This layer protects the metal from further oxidation

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aluminium_oxide

 

Copper is a metal that does not react with water (H2O), but the oxygen of the air will react slowly at room temperature to form a layer of brown-black copper oxide on copper metal.

It is important to note that in contrast to the oxidation of iron by wet air that the layer formed by the reaction of air with copper has a protective effect against further corrosion. On old copper roofs a green layer of copper carbonate, called verdigris, can often be seen. A notable example of this is on the Statue of Liberty.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Verdigris

 

The copper in brass makes brass germicidal, via the oligodynamic effect. For example, brass doorknobs disinfect themselves of many bacteria within eight hours.[6] This effect is important in hospitals, but useful in many contexts.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brass

 

Passivation

 

Passivation is the process of making a material "passive" in relation to another material prior to using the materials together. For example, prior to storing hydrogen peroxide in an aluminium container, the container can be passivated by rinsing it with a dilute solution of nitric acid and peroxide alternating with deionized water. The nitric acid and peroxide oxidizes and dissolves any impurities on the inner surface of the container, and the deionized water rinses away the acid and oxidized impurities. Another typical passivation process of cleaning stainless steel tanks involves cleaning with sodium hydroxide and citric acid followed by nitric acid (up to 20% at 120 °F) and a complete water rinse. This process will restore the film, remove metal particles, dirt, and welding-generated compounds (e.g. oxides).

In the context of corrosion, passivation is the spontaneous formation of a hard non-reactive surface film that inhibits further corrosion. This layer is usually an oxide or nitride that is a few atoms thick.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passivation

 

Edit: I suppose its possible that a surface level of dirt will increase the weight very slightly on the coins, which, in part, accounts for some of the +- tolerance in weight.

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