Jump to content

Recommended Posts

You could only assume it was real even if you were an expert. And an expert dealer can always pass it onto another person.

 

A determined person with knowledge could produce a less valueable coin that would be next to impossible to seperate from the real thing without analysis or damage to the coin, which is why you need the paperwork when you sell the coins

Yeah, but $50. If it was me, I'd consider that a good risk/ reward transaction with what looks and feels like a Maple in my hand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yeah, but $50. If it was me, I'd consider that a good risk/ reward transaction with what looks and feels like a Maple in my hand.

 

I suppose it is true that such a coin would be collectable also.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You could only assume it was real even if you were an expert. And an expert dealer can always pass it onto another person.

 

A determined person with knowledge could produce a less valueable coin that would be next to impossible to seperate from the real thing without analysis or damage to the coin, which is why you need the paperwork when you sell the coins

 

 

Why are you propagating such nonsense? If you have no experience of gold, you just need to weigh the coin and measure it. Anyone used to handling coins can immediately feel the difference in weight or size of something that is not gold. The idea that 'paperwork' is needed when trading gold coins is laughable. Do you have 'paperwork' for your fiat money? It is rather easy to forge bank notes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You could only assume it was real even if you were an expert. And an expert dealer can always pass it onto another person.

 

A determined person with knowledge could produce a less valueable coin that would be next to impossible to seperate from the real thing without analysis or damage to the coin, which is why you need the paperwork when you sell the coins

You clearly have not handled much physical gold.Any so called expert dealer who would pass off fake gold would not be in business long enough to be classed as an expert.I would be alot more concerned with fake toilet/fiat paper and pound coins if i was you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gold is underperforming.

 

It should be much higher, with the Dollar so weak

t24_au_en_usoz_6.gif

 

At a trendline top?

goldlogqd.png

 

Gold-in-Euros may show it more clearly

goldxeu.png

 

Nothing here rules out a breakout. That remains a possibility

I would totally agree with that bubb,i think it shows the true level of understanding of what gold is and what is actually transpiring by the day in the economy,basically people have not got a clue what is coming like an express train.The few posts mentioning bubble mania in gold prices is beyond laughable most peple are selling their gold to the numerous advertisers to get themselves out of the cack short term and with rose tinted glasses praying for the good times to return.ooohhh dear what a shock these poor people/sheeple are in for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why are you propagating such nonsense? If you have no experience of gold, you just need to weigh the coin and measure it. Anyone used to handling coins can immediately feel the difference in weight or size of something that is not gold. The idea that 'paperwork' is needed when trading gold coins is laughable. Do you have 'paperwork' for your fiat money? It is rather easy to forge bank notes.

just noticed your post schaublin are we spiritually related ??

 

 

k1292503.jpg

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wren

 

For sure my body contains more gold per tonne than gold ores also.

 

But if gold is useful then the mined amounts of gold seem sufficient for where it is useful and the mined cost of gold is probably half the price. So gold is in a bubble on that basis. Dr Bubbs says gold is underperforming, suggesting not only is it not in a bubble but that it is underpriced as i read that comment. Perhaps he means underperforming relative to expectations? Or does he mean relative to useful materials such as copper?

 

Goldfinger says that gold is a monetary asset. As far as i know central bank settlements do have some relationship to transfer of gold but how that works exactly i dont know in a world without obvious gold connections between currencies.

 

By the way can you find the Finland is 'great economicly' or 'is a model of excellence' thread?? I think it needs an update. I cant find it. Finlands september exports fell 36% for the same period last year and imports were down 30% for the period

 

http://newsroom.finland.fi/stt/showarticle...;group=Business

What is in the WATER in FINLAND ??? :blink::blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Interesting chart but Europe will be broken surely by such a weak exchange rate and the US will be exporting like crazy so it is hard to see that happening

 

The US is a major manufacturer. It is the worlds largest manufacturing economy

Please elaborate on that i am all ears.??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Seems we are on similar wavelengths.

 

Dont forget though other parts of the world are in a similar situation although one thing that surprises me here in Finland is that you can buy a plastic bucket made in Finland and many hand tools made in Finland. But things here are horribly expensive and you get the impression there is some kind of command economy reasons for why you cant get a cheaper bucket. For some reason chicken is on special all of november at only 1.19 per kg and was only 2.25 before that. Otherwise i think some people might be starving to death. Plenty of surveys testify to the cost of living in Finland but many highlight the quality of life - i am not so convinced that many people do live so well. Compared to living in NZ it is much harder to live here. People seem to live in pretty small flats for example. And yet there is no shortage of land.

alk are you reading the posts correctly GF is clearly not on your 'similar wavelength'.Quote GF "i spent 3 weeks in the us and only SAW things that were manafactured in CHINA."

What town/city in finland do you live??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Obviously coin shops are liberally scattered around where you are, the nearest to me is Harrods now i suppose, at about 25 miles it would only be a 6 or 7 hour walk each way. As for regular jewellers, it's a possibility but even then, I don't know if I'd place much credence in the opinions of the shopgirl in H Samuel or Elizabeth Duke.

 

Uh, I suppose there is a high density of coin shops where I live then. I can think of three within a 15 minutes drive from my house in Italy and a few in London too.

 

So you think somebody would give you 1100 dollars of gold while they wait outside and you go inside a shop?

 

Or if somebody was near a coin shop trying to sell coins for much less than the apparent value they would not be working in cahoots with the coin shop owner for sure so it would require no brains to know that was the case?

 

You seem to think people will trust you and you seem to trust others

 

Well it's up to him, of course. If he is willing to make the deal, he will wait. If he isn't even after I offer to pay twice as much, probably either he is not so desperate or he is a scammer.

 

If he wants to sell the coin for $50, then he doesn't know its real value. If he doesn't know its real value, he won't be concerned with me going inside a shop and have it checked. If what you are saying is that I should not trust the coin shop owner, I thought it's pretty obvious that I'd sell the coin straight away, go out and pay the guy his $100. I can't see any serious risk in this approach.

 

As for your comment, I find it pretty funny for a very personal reason: pretty much everyone close to me points out how hard it is to gain my trust :lol:

Which is both a compliment and a criticism, no? :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
alk are you reading the posts correctly GF is clearly not on your 'similar wavelength'.Quote GF "i spent 3 weeks in the us and only SAW things that were manafactured in CHINA."

What town/city in finland do you live??

 

He said in the shops

 

I have lived in places other than finland - finland being exceptional in my recent experience

 

Finland has a significant amount of uranium in some of the water when bore holes are used

 

I have a gold crown in my mouth which i counted as in my body

 

If you dont know about US manufacturing i will leave that one for you to find out about. Go to a small airport for example and report the makers names. Go to a farm and note who makes the complex vehicles and machines. Who makes the computers? Who makes the very large buisiness computers? Few countries do make them. The us is a major manufacturer of stuff

 

You misunderstood my comment about the gold coin copy

 

Typically forgers place a heavy metal inside the gold so on the outside it is just pure gold. Which is why gold bars have drill holes in them where they have been tested to see if the inside is the stated purity. For large bars unless you have the traceable paperwork for the bar things get complicated as more holes need to be drilled or it needs melting down to be tested.

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Uh, I suppose there is a high density of coin shops where I live then. I can think of three within a 15 minutes drive from my house in Italy and a few in London too.

 

 

 

Well it's up to him, of course. If he is willing to make the deal, he will wait. If he isn't even after I offer to pay twice as much, probably either he is not so desperate or he is a scammer.

 

If he wants to sell the coin for $50, then he doesn't know its real value. If he doesn't know its real value, he won't be concerned with me going inside a shop and have it checked. If what you are saying is that I should not trust the coin shop owner, I thought it's pretty obvious that I'd sell the coin straight away, go out and pay the guy his $100. I can't see any serious risk in this approach.

 

As for your comment, I find it pretty funny for a very personal reason: pretty much everyone close to me points out how hard it is to gain my trust :lol:

Which is both a compliment and a criticism, no? :rolleyes:

 

My point was that you appeared dismissive of people who did not trust the seller saying no brains were needed

 

I felt it was fairly natural when it comes to money that people would not trust another - rather they want to verify things.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
He said in the shops

 

I have lived in places other than finland - finland being exceptional in my recent experience

 

Finland has a significant amount of uranium in some of the water when bore holes are used

 

I have a gold crown in my mouth which i counted as in my body

 

If you dont know about US manufacturing i will leave that one for you to find out about. Go to a small airport for example and report the makers names. Go to a farm and note who makes the complex vehicles and machines. Who makes the computers? Who makes the very large buisiness computers? Few countries do make them. The us is a major manufacturer of stuff

:lol::lol::lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You could only assume it was real even if you were an expert. And an expert dealer can always pass it onto another person.

 

A determined person with knowledge could produce a less valueable coin that would be next to impossible to seperate from the real thing without analysis or damage to the coin, which is why you need the paperwork when you sell the coins

Not for $50 they couldn't and most coin collectors will know where they can sell a good fake for more than $50, there is a market for fakes as well as the real thing.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My point was that you appeared dismissive of people who did not trust the seller saying no brains were needed

 

I felt it was fairly natural when it comes to money that people would not trust another - rather they want to verify things.

 

But those people did not want to verify things, that was their biggest mistake.

Anyway, sorry for derailing the thread a little bit :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What's going on with your knickers?

 

Do I have to increase your warning level to 30%? :P

oh come on GF my whit must be at least 1oo% on the GEI richter scale by now. :huh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I have only just watched that vid due to tech probs on laptop but if i was to make a movie for the post i made earlier copied below that would be it.People/sheeple have not got a clue PERIoD.!!!

 

 

 

"I would totally agree with that bubb,i think it shows the true level of understanding of what gold is and what is actually transpiring by the day in the economy,basically people have not got a clue what is coming like an express train.The few posts mentioning bubble mania in gold prices is beyond laughable most peple are selling their gold to the numerous advertisers to get themselves out of the cack short term and with rose tinted glasses praying for the good times to return.ooohhh dear what a shock these poor people/sheeple are in for."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

India Stampedes Into Gold

November 10, 2009 | From theTrumpet.com

In a cloud of dollar dust, India trumpets an exodus from the greenback.

 

Two hundred metric tons of gold—the largest gold purchase in history. Think 44 Asian elephants. The buyer’s motive was clear: to get away from the dollar. But why did America’s leaders give the okay for the imf to sell America’s gold?

 

Late last month the Central Bank of India bought 200 metric tons of gold from the International Monetary Fund. It is the biggest signal yet that Asian countries are moving away from the dollar, the Financial Times inferred. As he swapped his country’s dollars for hard assets, India’s finance minister was blunt: The economies of the U.S. and Europe have “collapsed.” India was doing what it could to prepare for the coming meltdown.

 

As the news hit the market in the middle of last week, currency and commodity traders thundered into action. Demand for the yellow metal surged as investors wondered if central banks from China, Europe and elsewhere would follow suit. Which would be the next central bank to trample the greenback? As traders speculated, the price for a single ounce of the precious metal blew past all previous records and hit above $1,100.

 

The real importance is this: When gold soars, the dollar is usually getting pulverized.

 

Since the collapse of the Bretton Woods monetary agreement, the world has conducted its trade and paid its bills in dollars—not gold. This decision was largely based upon the fact that America had a strong economy, was a major creditor nation with low debts, and that America had a reputation for fighting inflation and defending the dollar’s value.

 

For years, this experiment worked out well. Having the world’s reserve currency meant that the world needed to hold dollars to conduct trade. Knowing this, foreign governments stocked up on dollars, holding them in reserve against economic downturns and saving them for future spending.

 

All this foreign demand for dollars worked well for America too—at least at first. The extra demand pushed up the value of the dollar. This made foreign imports less expensive. Flush with extra purchasing power, U.S. consumers embarked upon the greatest multi-decade spending binge ever—purchasing everything from Japanese and German automobiles to Indian steel to Chinese clothing and electronics. Standards of living surged.

 

The U.S. government liked this arrangement too. Whenever the economy slowed down, or the government needed a little more money, it just printed up some more dollars or issued a few more treasury bonds. The world’s dollar demand sopped up the extra money, so America didn’t have to deal with the ugly dollar-printing-means-ballooning-debt side effects, including the soaring inflation and rising interest rates that would normally result.

 

Yet all wasn’t well. As America encouraged the world to collect dollars (the new reserve currency) and dump gold (the old reserve currency), an unforeseen, dramatic reaction occurred.

 

Foreign importers began to replace American industry. U.S. manufacturers were forced out of business or relocated overseas. The U.S. economy radically changed. America rapidly evolved from a production-focused economy into a consumption-focused economy. It went from the world’s creditor nation to the world’s largest debtor nation. And, over just the past decade, its currency—the dollar—lost one third of its value.

 

“The dollar’s swoon is prompting a bit of revisionist history, putting gold back en vogue,” says Bloomberg’s William Pesek. “It says much about where the global financial system finds itself.”

 

So now the world is looking for a way out from underneath its piles and piles of depreciating dollars. India’s purchase is “a landmark trade,” said Barclays Capital gold specialist Jonathan Spall. It is “a sign for other central banks and sovereign wealth funds.” The dollar exodus is set in motion.

 

For the past 38 years, central banks have embraced the U.S. dollar. But the shift is on—and it is going to completely blindside those in Washington.

 

Many people don’t realize that the gold the imf sold was actually American. The gold owned by the imf was contributed by the U.S. and European central banks at the Fund’s establishment. Many times over the last decade, the imf has sought to sell its gold and spend the money, but Washington consistently vetoed it—that is, until this last year when the current administration gave the go-ahead.

 

U.S. politicians don’t understand history. During America’s worst time of crisis since the 1930s, as confidence in the dollar is failing, America should be repatriating its gold from the imf—not selling it.

 

American politicians may have deluded themselves into believing that the dollar is better than gold, but the world obviously isn’t convinced. Both China and Russia are very vocal about their desire to increase their gold holdings and move away from the U.S. dollar. China and Russia have even indicated their desire for a new world reserve currency. But when America’s allies announce their desire to diversify away from the dollar, America should wake up.

 

The timing of India’s announcement was very interesting too. During the last two weeks of October, when India was negotiating with the imf, Russian officials reportedly “leaked” that Russia might, for the first time since the fall of the Soviet Union, sell a large portion of its state gold reserves.

 

By leaking that it would sell large amounts of gold, Russia helped keep a lid on gold prices just as India was seeking to complete the largest gold purchase in history. What will Russia ask for in return for this favor?

 

Meanwhile, back at the bank, the imf has announced it will sell another 200 tons. Will Russia, or China—or Europe—get this chunk of American gold?

 

India’s gold purchase should be a warning to America. Usually Second World nations have to put up their gold as collateral for loans from the First World. Now developing nations are the ones with the gold, and it is America that is relinquishing control.

 

India now has some mammoth gold reserves. It also has $6.7 billion less paper money. And it thinks it got a great deal. This bold move is something that shouldn’t be ignored. India’s stampede into gold is a picture we shouldn’t forget.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://news.morningstar.com/articlenet/art...67&pgid=rss

 

It's not just commodities funds or investors, however, who are interested. More than a handful of diversified-stock mutual funds have added the metal, both in the form of gold bullion and gold exchange-traded funds (specifically SPDR Gold Shares (GLD

 

Sponsored by:

GLD) and iShares COMEX Gold Trust (IAU

 

Sponsored by:

IAU) ). Sure, many funds have dabbled in gold miners from time to time, but the ownership of physical bullion is unusual.

 

----

Didnt know it was sponsored not until I copied and pasted here

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
He said in the shops

 

I have lived in places other than finland - finland being exceptional in my recent experience

 

Finland has a significant amount of uranium in some of the water when bore holes are used

 

I have a gold crown in my mouth which i counted as in my body

 

If you dont know about US manufacturing i will leave that one for you to find out about. Go to a small airport for example and report the makers names. Go to a farm and note who makes the complex vehicles and machines. Who makes the computers? Who makes the very large buisiness computers? Few countries do make them. The us is a major manufacturer of stuff

You misunderstood my comment about the gold coin copy

 

Typically forgers place a heavy metal inside the gold so on the outside it is just pure gold. Which is why gold bars have drill holes in them where they have been tested to see if the inside is the stated purity. For large bars unless you have the traceable paperwork for the bar things get complicated as more holes need to be drilled or it needs melting down to be tested.

 

ALK send this guy your evidence he reckons all the us export is PRoMISES and PRETTY PAPER!!!

 

CNBC - Dollar Will be Utterly Destroyed, Global Currency, New World Order

 

 

From:

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pierre Lassonde on Bloomberg right now!

 

Basically he said gold is in a bull market and has 4-9 years left to run, he also said that gold production is flat and will be for at least 4 years or so.

 

Not a great interview as was very rushed. Bloomberg seemed to want to get onto the next segment which was all about Call of Duty 4... :huh:

 

I'm sure it's a great game, but FFS! :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Investment firm chief backs GATA on Bloomberg Asia TV

Submitted by cpowell on Tue, 2009-11-10 03:43. Section: Daily Dispatches

10:40p ET Monday, November 9, 2009

 

Dear Friend of GATA and Gold (and Silver):

 

Viewers of Bloomberg Television's Asian news programming today saw a vigorous endorsement of GATA's work by Juerg Kiener, managing director and chief investment officer of Swiss Asia Capital in Singapore.

 

Bloomberg Asia TV moderator Bernard Lo, interviewing Kiener about gold, asked him what he thought of GATA. Kiener replied that he supports what GATA is saying about manipulation of the gold market. "Central banks will always try to keep the currency up and keep the alternative down," Kiener said. He added that it is "impossible" for two banks to hold most of the short position in the silver futures market without it being manipulation.

 

Lo announced that he will have GATA Chairman Bill Murphy on his program this month.

 

You can watch Lo's interview with Kiener at the Bloomberg Internet site here:

 

http://tinyurl.com/yg36uj9

 

But do not watch this interview if you live in North America. You're not supposed to see stuff like this within 3,000 miles of New York and Washington.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×