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I have been following gallium closely for some time with the thought that demand will increase very quickly. What with it's use in photo-voltaic panels and diode lighting. Your post has generated no interest and that seems to be the state of the gallium industry. This cannot last for ever.

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I have been following gallium closely for some time with the thought that demand will increase very quickly. What with it's use in photo-voltaic panels and diode lighting. Your post has generated no interest and that seems to be the state of the gallium industry. This cannot last for ever.

i know - may be its even more contrarian than this site

 

think i may invest in a little

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i know - may be its even more contrarian than this site

 

think i may invest in a little

 

what are the options for investing in Gallium? don't think there is an ETF for this one yet ;)

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anyone got any strong views on Gallium. used in Solar Power technology

 

No strong views but IQE use it in wafers, presume other wafer manufacturers do.

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I hear that gallium is used in LEDs... This seems to be a technology with a lot of potential. It has low power consumption and is extremely bright. Applications include lighting and display screens. However, most of the interesting applications I've found seem to be to do with OLEDs ... organic LEDs and I'm guessing they don't use gallium.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organic_light-emitting_diode

 

An article from 2002 about Quantum dot LED (QD-OLED), possibly a future replacement for the backlit LCD computer monitor / flat screen TV etc.

 

http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2002/dot.html

 

Gallium does have potential for lighting applications....

 

http://www.galliumlighting.com/

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I hear that gallium is used in LEDs... This seems to be a technology with a lot of potential. It has low power consumption and is extremely bright. Applications include lighting and display screens. However, most of the interesting applications I've found seem to be to do with OLEDs ... organic LEDs and I'm guessing they don't use gallium.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organic_light-emitting_diode

 

An article from 2002 about Quantum dot LED (QD-OLED), possibly a future replacement for the backlit LCD computer monitor / flat screen TV etc.

 

http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2002/dot.html

 

Gallium does have potential for lighting applications....

 

http://www.galliumlighting.com/

 

 

Gallium along with the rest of the REE are mined almost exclusivly in China from the giant Bayan Oboo deposit ~95% of world production.

Brazil used to be a domiant supplier along with India but they have been superceeded by the Chinnese in recent years.

 

The only new comer to the world of REE apart from a small private company I am involved with is "Emerging Metals Ltd"

They Acquired the rights to process the slag piles from Weatherly Internaionals Copper/Zinc smelters in Namibia which

contain elevated REE's.

 

Emerging Metals is due to list, I believe, later this year on Londons AIM.

 

LED, Light Emiting Diodes, while a potential consumer of gallium use so little that I honestly don't know if they will effect the price, better to invest in either the producer of the actual Gallium Arsenide, Gallium Nitride, Indo Gallium Arsenide etc or the manufactures of the LEDs them selves.

 

New developments in photovoltaics is an area which could significantly increase the demand for Gallium and its' REE "cousins". The new technologies that are trying to create transparant photovoltaic pannels to replace the vast amounts of glass on commercial buildings is an exciting area of development and one which I think could have a major impact on REE usages.

 

On a different tact the replacement of tungsten filament bulbs with low energy incandesants is a rather bizarre notion. Sure the incandesants use one 5th of the energy but each bulb contains a small amount of mercury. . . . How many of you have disposed of a low energy bulb in the normal waste lately?? I can see a push to ban these in the near future and this can only bode well for the new and alternative technologies such as LEDs.

In the meantime, check out the mecury price and more importantly the stockpiles around the world. While over 90% of mercury is recycled 10% is still alot especially if growth is around 3%, equates to an effective 30% increase in supply.

This "leveraged" supply requirement is the same for lead and look at what has happened to the price of that lately. Everyone in India and China wants a car!

 

 

The Speculator

 

 

 

The above info is not investment advise nor a solicitation to buy any security mentioned or invest in any commodity or future.

 

 

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Yes, Mercury. That is something I've been looking at.

 

How would you play it?

 

 

There is no way to invest directly into Gallium so I have personally decided to play Gallium via:

- SRZ (Strategy Resource Acquisition)

- GCU (Gold Canyon Resources)

 

SRZ is a start-up Zinc mine with relative high levels of Gallium and Germanium as a by-product and they have secured an agreement with the nearby smeltyer to retrieve the Zinc processing residue for free in order to extract Gallium and Germanium. They are planning to become the larget US producer for Gallium. More info on it there (http://www.greenenergyinvestors.com/index.php?showtopic=2007&hl=gallium)

 

GCU is a junior Gold and Gallium explorer. They potentially have the largest primary Gallium deposit in the world. More info on it there (http://www.greenenergyinvestors.com/index.php?showtopic=778&hl=\gold+canyon\).

 

Gallium was first brought to my attention by Jim Mellon's book (which is not too bad to get a few ideas) and he strongly believes in Gallium because of the new generation of CIGS thin-film solar cells.

 

He is actually launching a new venture Emerging Metals that is due to be quoted on AIM sometime this year. They have acquired the rights to process smelters residue in Africa which contain high contents of Gallium and Indium. There is hardly any info on that company though.

 

In the book the following companies are identified with an exposure to Gallium:

 

- Recyclex (French company producing Gallium among other metals)

- New Jersey Mining Company (NJMC:US)

- Gold Canyon Resources (GCU)

- Bluglass BLG:AU

- Dowa Mining 5714:JP Japanese and larget producer of Gallium

- AXT INC AXTI:US

 

Frizzers, Jim Mellon was recently at a roundtable discussion at MoneyWeek and mentioned his company. Maybe you could use that connection to find out more about this? Maybe a good idea for a CWR interview?

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Funny enough the MoneyWeek from this Friday has a cover story on Solar Energy and Gallium (along with Indium and Germanium) gets a mention (http://www.moneyweek.com/file/11557/latest-issue.html) with a few of the companies (Dowa mining and Bluglass) being highlighted as potential investments... And of course Jim Mellon's company gets a mention again..

The sceptic in me starts to believe that with the hype he is creating around this, he is guranteed to do weel... If not in the Gallium itself, in the IPO proceeds...

Anybody having any views/more info on his Emerging Metals company, Frizzers, any interesting MoneyWeek insights?

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He's someone I'd like to interview.

 

He's certainly ramping his new company like mad with Moneyweek the perfect vehicle. There will be plenty of buyers at IPO as a result.

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He's certainly ramping his new company like mad with Moneyweek the perfect vehicle. There will be plenty of buyers at IPO as a result.

 

... which is why I am probably give his IPO a miss and just keep it on my watchlist. I have seen quite a few IPOs on AIM doing well with the share price going up for the last first few months and then declining below initial IPO price. This was particluarly true of close-ended funds where it took them a bit of time to get the funds raised from the IPO fully invested - so I am not sure how this would apply to Emerging Metals.

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