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What to do with slags?


RaoulDuke
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Hi all, just bumped into this forum and if this is not the place to ask such questions, please inform me.

 

 

Our company has in its possession large amounts of different types of Slags:

 

Copper Slag

 

Nickel Slag

 

Iron Slag

 

Iron Residues

 

 

All those slags bearing high Fe content and limited and small copper/nickel/zinc content. Is there any way to upgrade those slags into commercial levels?

for example, the copper slag- is there any way (but financial) to increase the copper content in the slag? is there a way to upgrade the Fe content to commercial levels (60% up).

 

Would kindly appreciate your advises and suggestions,

 

Cheers

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  • 4 weeks later...
Hi all, just bumped into this forum and if this is not the place to ask such questions, please inform me.

 

 

Our company has in its possession large amounts of different types of Slags:

 

Copper Slag

 

Nickel Slag

 

Iron Slag

 

Iron Residues

 

 

All those slags bearing high Fe content and limited and small copper/nickel/zinc content. Is there any way to upgrade those slags into commercial levels?

for example, the copper slag- is there any way (but financial) to increase the copper content in the slag? is there a way to upgrade the Fe content to commercial levels (60% up).

 

Would kindly appreciate your advises and suggestions,

 

Cheers

 

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Hi all, just bumped into this forum and if this is not the place to ask such questions, please inform me.

 

 

Our company has in its possession large amounts of different types of Slags:

 

Copper Slag

 

Nickel Slag

 

Iron Slag

 

Iron Residues

 

 

All those slags bearing high Fe content and limited and small copper/nickel/zinc content. Is there any way to upgrade those slags into commercial levels?

for example, the copper slag- is there any way (but financial) to increase the copper content in the slag? is there a way to upgrade the Fe content to commercial levels (60% up).

 

Would kindly appreciate your advises and suggestions,

 

Cheers

 

°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°

Hi RaoulDuke,

 

There has been a lot of interest in recovering iron from various sorts of iron residues the last several years with the runup in iron and steel prices, though right now with the economy slow nothing much is moving. Historically, irony residues (as in electric arc furnace dust) containing nickel or chromium have been converted to ferro-nickel and ferro chrome alloys via pyrometallurgical methods. Such alloys are used in stainless steel manufacture. This is quite a lucrative business. Processing of carbon steel EAF dust, while widespread, is not so lucrative.

 

Other wastes containing iron have also been processed both pyrometallurgically and hydrometallurgically to recover iron. However, there is usually a problem when copper is present, as the steel mills do not like copper. However, there can often be found a special user of such materials if one is willing to do a bit of looking and marketing.

 

Duisburger Kupferhutte in Duisburg, Germany specializes in recovering metals from irony wastes. They have made over 300 specialty products to serve specialty industries. They use essentially a iron blast furnace. They are of course located in a highly industrialized area serving many different industries, so raw material needs cover a wide range. If your waste is off in the boonies, then shipping becomes a major determinant of what can be done.

 

A technology holder like Ausmelt in Australia has a wide variety of experience in pyrometallurgical processing of metals. They may also be able to help you.

 

Copper - nickel converters produce a iron slag that in existing plants can be quite thoroughly cleaned of residual copper and nickel. However, if you have a similar slag from an earlier operation, reaching similar recovery levels by similar methods would likely not be economical. The original copper (and/or nickel) in the ore paid the heating bills to melt the material along with the rest of the process operating and capital equipment costs.

 

The above is a pretty general response to your problem. One would have to take a closer look at what you have to be more specific. For example, depending on the variations in the wastes, there may be benefits in processing only part of the waste by higher efficiency methods directed at the particular components.

 

Hope this helps some.

 

Regards,

Augurelli

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You could try approaching shot/grit blast medium suppliers. I used to work the shot blast industry and we used copper slag, chilled iron, aluminum oxide etc..

 

You could try contacting this company to see if you could supply them.

 

http://www.scangrit.co.uk/

 

Keywords to use in a search would be... shotblast/shot blast/shot-blast medium, sandblast medium, gritblast medium, abrasive cleaning medium. You could also substitute the word suppliers, or products for medium.

 

http://www.kellysearch.com/qu-product-1298.html

 

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